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Architectural Details: The Perfect Prefabricated Home

Thứ năm - 10/08/2017 10:32
Building first evolved out of the dynamics between needs (shelter, security, worship, etc.) and means (available building materials and attendant skills). As human cultures developed and knowledge began to be formalized through oral traditions and practices, building became a craft, and “architecture” is the name given to the most highly formalized and respected versions of that craft.

It is widely assumed that architectural success was the product of a process of trial and error, with progressively less trial and more replication as the results of the process proved increasingly satisfactory. What is termed vernacular architecture continues to be produced in many parts of the world. Indeed, vernacular buildings make up most of the built world that people experience every day. Early human settlements were mostly rural. Due to a surplus in production the economy began to expand resulting in urbanization thus creating urban areas which grew and evolved very rapidly in some cases, such as that of Çatal Höyük in Anatolia and Mohenjo Daro of the Indus Valley Civilization in modern-day Pakistan.

“A house in Japan is considered differently from one in Europe. It is more transient, sits more lightly on the ground”

They grew out of harsh conditions – the devastation of war, privations of the aftermath, recurrent earthquakes, shortage of land – but then often chose to add voluntary challenges of their own. There are houses where the rooms are separated by courtyards, such that you have to expose yourself to the weather to pass from one to another, or where unusable voids are inserted into already cramped locations, or where normal expectations of privacy, comfort, cosiness, domesticity, beauty and shelter are, with careful deliberation but for reasons not completely explained, challenged.

Then there are the full-sized constructions, the hut-on-stilts and the white boxes, one the work of the idiosyncratic reviver of traditional craft, the other a recreation of the house of 2005 by the Pritzker prize winner. The latter is conceived as a series of small pavilions connected by courts, recreated here with books, music, films and personal objects recalling the life of its owner. Lighting rises and falls in imitation of the cycle of day and night, accelerated to 60 minutes. When it’s darker you can see films projected against the exterior of the building, which is something he likes to do. It is as immersive as the other material is restrained, creating an alternate version of the original rather than a perfect simulacrum.

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London City Hall with sunset

The architecture of different parts of Asia developed along different lines from that of Europe; Buddhist, Hindu and Sikh architecture each having different characteristics. Buddhist architecture, in particular, showed great regional diversity. Hindu temple architecture, which developed around the 3rd century BCE, is governed by concepts laid down in the Shastras, and is concerned with expressing the macrocosm and the microcosm. In many Asian countries, pantheistic religion led to architectural forms that were designed specifically to enhance the natural landscape.

With the emerging knowledge in scientific fields and the rise of new materials and technology, architecture and engineering began to separate, and the architect began to concentrate on aesthetics and the humanist aspects, often at the expense of technical aspects of building design. To satisfy the contemporary ethos a building should be constructed in a manner which is environmentally friendly in terms of the production of its materials, its impact upon the natural and built environment of its surrounding area and the demands that it makes upon non-sustainable power sources for heating, cooling, water and waste management and lighting.

In the late 20th century a new concept was added to those included in the compass of both structure and function, the consideration of sustainability, hence sustainable architecture.

“WE SHAPE OUR BUILDINGS; THEREAFTER THEY SHAPE US.”

Landscape architecture is the design of outdoor public areas, landmarks, and structures to achieve environmental, social-behavioral, or aesthetic outcomes. It involves the systematic investigation of existing social, ecological, and soil conditions and processes in the landscape, and the design of interventions that will produce the desired outcome.

Tác giả bài viết: Trần Phương

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